Kuhn, Land Trust Announce Protection of 108 Acres near Purcellville

The Land Trust of Virginia has announced a new conservation easement on land on the northwest boundary of the Town of Purcellville, protecting 108 acres with the help of JK Moving founder Chuck Kuhn.

The property fronts Hillsboro Road, Allder School Road and Short Hill Road, with 3,000 feet of frontage on Allder School Road. According to the Land Trust, more than 90% of the property features “Prime Farmland” or “Farmland of Statewide Importance,” designations by the state Department of Conservation and Recreation. The property includes 15.6 acres of forest cover and one small pond near the southern boundary.

The pond is considered an instance of a “Ponded” wetland, designated as such by the National Wetlands Inventory of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The property is in the watersheds of Catoctin Creek, the Potomac River, and the Chesapeake Bay.

“Furthering the density of conserved land in western Loudoun County was central to the mission behind our founding in 1992,” stated Land Trust of Virginia Executive Director Sally Price. “We are grateful this easement creates a buffer around Purcellville to help prevent additional development sprawl.”

The Hillsboro Road property is the 216th easement completed by the Land Trust of Virginia. The Land Trust has worked with 216 families, conserving a total of 25,271 acres in 22 counties in Virginia. For more information about the Land Trust, go to landtrustva.org.

The Kuhn family has preserved thousands of acres of land in Loudoun by putting it under conservation easement. Over the past decade, they said they have placed more than 22,000 acres under conservation easement, both in Loudoun and elsewhere.

6 thoughts on “Kuhn, Land Trust Announce Protection of 108 Acres near Purcellville

  • 2021-12-30 at 2:11 pm
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    Kudos to Land Trust of Virginia & the Kuhn family. I think it’s a good thing when Loudoun’s natural beauty can be preserved. By no means am I against development. To the contrary, Loudoun should be welcoming to folks from all backgrounds & income levels. But the sheer beauty of Loudoun’s natural habitat must be preserved to the largest extent possible. Happy New Year Loudoun!

  • 2021-12-30 at 7:53 pm
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    Thats some really nice productive ag land. Good to see it preserved!

  • 2021-12-31 at 4:18 am
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    Much like the trampling the Board of Supervisors is willing to do at Bles Park there is the Hidden Lane Landfill/Askergrens property. A dump with a plume of TCE contaminating the water table and the Potomac River. Any activity will disturb the plume infecting more wells making the water unusable. The EPA’s solution though commendable has proven not to be effective every time. Building near a flood plain is just crazy, Agnes, a hundred-year flood will be back. Before the Board of Supervisors adds to the problem here’s hoping the “Trust” people, Sally Price and Mr. Kuhn will look at preserving these 240 acres as the Algonkian Wilderness!

  • 2022-01-06 at 11:00 pm
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    WTF, the sale of the landfill property pays the EPA, State and LOCO for costs of mitigation. The plume is not expanding, mitigated by injection of microbes. Plume is 100 feet under ground. No impact to river. Existing well issue resolved by extension of county water service into Broad Run Farms. Agnes was a 500 yr storm. I was here and lived through it.

    On the other hand, both properties have around 3/4 mile of Potomac River frontage. There are 100 year old walnut trees on both. A concrete boat landing and around an area of around 1/2 acre that may be an enslaved cemetery that crosses both properties.

    I doubt Kuhn would be interested as these parcels do not fit his business model.

    On the other hand the County is flush with a surplus. They would be a great purchase for 50% less than the Claude Moore purchase 25 years ago.

  • 2022-01-06 at 11:18 pm
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    Also, the landfill cap should be tree free. Roots from the trees allow water to contaminate the contents of the landfill. Trees on the cap are invasive Bradford Pear trees. Solar panels will ensure the cap is sealed.

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